VanGorden Partners with Junior Achievement to Share Lessons on Entrepreneurship

VanGorden Partners with Junior Achievement to Share Lessons on Entrepreneurship
Posted on 04/26/2017
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students with Junior Achievement volunteersJunior Achievement (JA) works with Lakota on a number of programs to help promote business education – everything from coordinating job shadowing field trips for junior high students to teaching classroom lessons on economics and business concepts to elementary students.

This year, all VanGorden Elementary fourth-graders get to participate in a five-week program on entrepreneurship. Volunteers from JA visit for an hour once a week, sharing their workforce experience and presenting the lessons and activities prepared by Junior Achievement. Lessons have been developed for all elementary grade levels to match up with the curriculum.

“We’ve had Junior Achievement come into our third grade classrooms to share economics lessons, and this year fourth-graders are learning about entrepreneurship,” said Principal Gail Allshouse. “These programs are so worthwhile, and the kids get a lot out of it. It’s an eye opener for them to see how business works on a local, regional and global scale.”

Social studies teacher Tina Abner has had her third-graders participate for years and now her fourth-graders are part of the program as well. Students and volunteers alike love the program. Kathie Hays, a volunteer from West Chester Hospital, has worked with Abner’s classrooms for years, and recruited fellow employees to help teach the lessons to all six sections of fourth grade.

In the five sessions, students learn how to be an entrepreneur, about regional resources, how entrepreneurs are problem-solvers, and then compare their region to the world.

In one activity, students play a hot dog stand game to learn about the basic tasks performed by a business owner. As part of the game, students track revenue and expenses, problem-solve and make business decisions, and demonstrate a supply chain through a hands-on manufacturing and trade experience.

“I like that the JA lessons fit with our curriculum and give students a different perspective on the topics we are teaching in the classroom,” said Abner. “The students really enjoy it too.”